3-D Diversity: Why progressive brands see workforce diversity as a competitive advantage not a compliance issue.

3D Workforce Diversity Model

3D Workforce Diversity Model

Workforce diversity has become a hot topic over the last few years. Minority groups are still shockingly underrepresented, and companies’ HR departments are under increasing pressure to comply with equal employment opportunity regulations. Unfortunately, this focus on checking the compliance box can never unlock the full potential of true diversity.

In a seminal Harvard Business Review article on 2-D diversity, there’s compelling evidence that companies who embrace both inherent diversity (traits such as gender, sexual orientation, nationality and ethnicity) with additional acquired diversity (traits gained from experience – skills, education, cultural exposure), are more innovative and grow faster.

Acquired diversity is the result of life experiences. The more diverse inputs you experience, the richer your creative journey, and the more ‘compound interest’ you accumulate in your creativity-bank. However, many companies still hire people who think similarly, come from similar backgrounds with similar life experiences.

The debate around diversity so far has focused on the workforce within organisational boundaries and overlooks the most important stakeholder group: external audience. If you want to be a creative brand you need to embrace acquired diversity as much as possible.

Opening open up to communities around the brand would unlock what we’d call 3-D diversity. Embedding the raw creativity and visceral experiences of people who live at the edges of culture, into the innovation process itself, will drastically improve the creative journey of your brand and ultimately, as proven, supercharge your innovation and growth.

A decade ago, when sustainability became a hot topic, Nike was one of the first companies to turn sustainability from a problem into an opportunity – to great success. We believe the same shift will happen with diversity.

What’s your opinion? Are you an innovation leader that has a story to tell about the benefits of diversity, we would love to hear from you!

Why bankers are now more creative at research than marketers

banker-research

banker-researchJust as marketers are trying to come to terms with big data, the world’s most sophisticated financial minds are finding creative ways to escape from it. At Sense Worldwide, we work with consumer giants like Nike, PepsiCo and Samsung, but we also work with private equity companies on the prowl for big takeover opportunities. I have news for the marketers out there: the bean counters are coming up with some of the most radical research briefs we’ve seen.

For example, one private equity company is buying daily satellite images of shopping mall car parks to predict footfall. They find it more accurate than any econometric model. Quite a few analysts pay people to count ships and trucks. There’s often little correlation between the reported amount of, say, ore reportedly coming out of a mine and the number trucks that pull up there. A certain hedge fund legend has an even simpler way of tracking data on a certain coffee chain. He noticed that their receipts have a universal sales number on them. Every day he buys a coffee and a muffin, then plugs his receipt number into a spreadsheet, and gets a pretty good estimate of sales volume. Marketers, if you want to save money on research, learn from a billionaire.

We recently worked on a large buyout where we used social media analysis to predict future growth for the target company, and checked their quant research using our network of 5000 influential creative thinkers around the world. The sentiment, and the thought leaders, both indicated that the brand was on the wane, even though it had reported record sales. Our private equity client factored in the marketing cost to buoy the brand back up, and passed on the sale.

Why have the spreadsheet jockeys looked up from their screens? Well, you may remember 2007, the year that the financial industry was almost destroyed by mathematical models. Nobel-prizewinning economists built valuation algorithms like Black-Scholes that few truly understood. But a few bankers were suspicious of them. When analysts pitched high-margin mortgage products to Handelsbanken, its CEO did a radical thing. He got on a plane and went to see the homes backed by the bonds. He concluded that they’d all been bought by speculators, and passed on the deal. Handelsbanken had a good financial crisis. Bear Stearns, who bet the farm on financial models, did less well.

Say what you like about bankers, they’re not stupid. They learned from their mistakes. While marketers still use qualitative research to inspire hypotheses which they take into quant, the financiers are doing the opposite. Yes, they still use surveys and algorithms. But if they can’t make sense of them in the outside world, they’re rejecting them and going with their gut. Maybe some of their methodologies will sound a little weird. But when the Masters of the Universe look at the brand valuation models touted by the likes of WPP and Interbrand, I promise you, they’re boggling at the idea that anybody would take that stuff seriously.

There’s never been a better time to be a Chinese appliance brand in the West.

chinese-appliances

chinese-appliances

 

Western consumers have changed over the last five years. Once, the middle classes looked down on value brands as cheap and inferior. Now they’re driving to Lidl and Aldi, snapping up bargains and boasting about how much they saved at dinner parties. Value brands are cropping up all over the home, from the food and appliances in the kitchen to the TV and laptop in the living room.

There are several reasons for this. The first is necessity. Median household incomes in the US dropped by 9.8% in the downturn. In the UK over the same period, they fell by 3.8%. Countries like Spain and Ireland saw even more alarming declines. Still, people need microwaves, fridges and televisions. So many consumers lowered their expectations, and moved away from premium brands. In our research, we’ve discovered that they were pleasantly surprised by what they found. The value brands were actually pretty good.

This wasn’t always the case. Twenty years ago, shopping for appliances involved a tricky balancing act; the cheap stuff wouldn’t work as well, and it would break sooner. If you bought a Miele vacuum, it would cost twice as much but maybe work three times as long as a basic one. Now, that’s less likely to be the case. Thanks to better manufacturing techniques and industrial design, it’s quite hard to buy a rubbish product in the west. There are always exceptions, of course. Turkish manufacturer Beko had a disastrous launch in the UK after many of their fridges burst into flames. Even the poorest western consumers have certain minimum standards. It turns out that they don’t like it when you burn their house down.

Now when you pay for an expensive appliance, you’re not simply forking out for better build quality. Brands like SMEG and AGA justify their margins with distinctive design, and American manufacturers compete on features like fancy ice dispensers. High margin TVs must look ultra-cool on a wall and have add-ons like internet connectivity. Ultimately, some people will always pay for a luxury label on their appliances. Chinese manufacturers can leave that market alone for the moment, and go after the middle classes who want more bang, and not badge, for their buck.

Why bother going after this market with your own brand, when you can create OEM products without the headaches of marketing and distribution? In a word, margins. Even the most successful OEM companies in China eventually get pinched by the margins they can command. Western brands own the relationship with the consumer, and mark up the product accordingly. Look at Foxconn: it grew 51% in the first year it assembled iPads for Apple. In 2012 its revenue grew by 1%. Now it’s launching its own brands of accessories and mobile technologies in a bid to kick-start its growth.

The path from OEM manufacturer to low-end brand to high-end aspirational badge might seem like a daunting one. However there are plenty of companies who’ve made the journey, and have the revenue growth to show it’s worthwhile. A decade ago, Samsung and LG sat firmly in the ‘stack ‘em high and sell ‘em cheap’ end of the market. Through innovative technologies and great design, they elevated their status to become sought-after brands with enviable margins. ASUS and Acer used to make laptops for Sony, Hewlett Packard and the rest, and saw their own computers sell at a fraction of the price. Thanks to beautiful product design, they’ve started to compete with the big players. Personally, I’d rather have a lovely ASUS Zenwatch than an Apple Watch.

In the meantime, Sony, which once seemed unassailable, has been crushed as consumers realised that a great-looking, reliable television could cost only $600.

Finally, there’s the whole question of origin: are US and European consumers ready for a Chinese appliance brand? In my experience, it’s not a question at all. A quick poll of my office, staffed by a diverse selection of super-smart and widely-read consultants, showed that nobody knew where Electrolux, Beko and Maytag came from (Sweden, Turkey, USA), and only one person guessed Zanussi was from Italy. Miele, Bosch and Siemens play off their German origins, and its association with high quality engineering and efficiency. The rest seem to go out of their way to obscure their roots. For many years, Zanussi claimed its products came from a different planet in its UK advertising. If British consumers will happily buy appliances made in outer space, they’re ready for microwaves from Shenzhen.

Chinese brands invented the ‘good enough’ category for developing world consumers; it took a downturn for it to catch on in developed markets. Western brands aren’t going to stand still, though. They don’t want to become the next Sony, and many have developed competitive products for Asian markets – the Electrolux range hood for stir-frying is a great example. It won’t be long before they start taking these products back to penny-counting north american and european consumers. There’s an opening for companies like Haier, SVA and Haisense to get into this market now. It won’t be there forever.

This article originally appeared in China Daily

Going to the edges for inspiration

now network pepsi

now network pepsi
 

Jacky Parsons, our Director of Research, spoke on one of our favourite topics at this year’s ESOMAR conference in Nice: extreme consumers. The conference is an annual get-together for members of the market research industry and this year’s theme was ‘inspiration’. At Sense, we find talking to extreme users incredibly inspiring. Nick Graham, our PepsiCo client, joined Jacky on stage to talk about the extremely creative members of the Pepsi Now Network, managed by Sense, who are having such a big influence at corporate HQ.

Going to the edges for inspiration
Together with our friends at PepsiCo Global Beverage Group, we wrote a paper on the value of speaking to extreme consumers.  Click here to download the full paper.

In the paper, we show how people with more intense and unusual experiences, attitudes and backgrounds – who we call extreme consumers – can unlock insights that transform the work of marketing and innovation teams, even if your target audience is mainstream.

We describe three types of extreme consumer:

1. The Lover vs the Rejector
This type sits at either extreme of the usage spectrum of your brand or category. Extreme Users have a much higher than average usage profile – in terms of frequency or quantity. Rejectors on the other hand are lapsed users or non-users who have chosen not to engage with your brand.

2. Experts
Don’t think of academics when you read the term ‘expert’. This kind of extreme user has expertise relevant to your brand or category because of the role they play in life, but it’s a lateral connection. So for example, a soldier can be an expert in blisters.

3. Leading-edge Creatives
These people are extreme in terms of their cultural engagement and creativity, and their lifestyles. This is the type of ‘extreme consumer’ we have involved in the Pepsi Now Network during 2014. They’re the opposite of a conventional research panel – they’re muses who guide internal teams and shape the thinking of external creative agencies.

As Anna Peters reported on the Esomar site: ‘For Nick Graham (PepsiCo USA) this has been the first time in his career where “agencies have been begging him” to speak to consumers. In short, this approach has resulted in an organisational shift – where the function of Market Research has been repositioned from reporting findings, to inspiring solutions.’

The Pepsi Now Network demonstrates that the value of any approach involving extreme users goes beyond the commercial benefits to the business – it makes a qualitative difference for everyone involved in the journey. The research process becomes more interesting and rewarding for everyone involved, whether they are participants, recruiters, agency teams or client teams – as a genuine human connection is forged between people and fresh insights are discovered. And that’s what inspires us, as much as the new ideas ignited by the interactions.